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IS THE GUN LAW FRENZY BY POLITICIANS CAUSING AMMO SHORTAGES?

 

By NWV News Writer Jim Kouri
Posted 1:00 AM Eastern
April 8, 2013
2013 NewsWithViews.com

With so much media attention on Thursday given to federal and state governments proposing or passing legislation that will have an impact on legitimate gun owners exercising their Second Amendment rights, many Americans in anticipation of strict gun control are buying ammunition and firearms accessories at rates never before seen, according to gun store owners and gun rights organizations.

"From what I'm hearing from gun dealers across the nation, it's becoming harder and harder for (gun) retailers to keep their stores well-stocked," said Saul Goshen, a New Jersey retailer. Goshen claims that some stores don't even have enough stock to service police officers and firing ranges.

The "gun store" run began with President Barack Obama's re-election. "In spite of his denials about infringing on constitutional rights, those 'in the know' realized quite some time ago that Obama has a very casual relationship with the truth. They knew he was biding his time to start an anti-gun owner campaign complete with the same level of dishonesty as his campaign for Obamacare," said former police firearms instructor now private investigator, Timothy Burgeon.

Almost immediately following the mass-murder of schoolchildren in Newtown, Conn., in December, the president and other progressives launched a campaign complete with a media blitz by their friends in news organizations to strengthen federal gun control. Several states also signed on to passing tighter laws such as limits on magazine sizes, bans on so-called assault rifles, and background checks that will include psychological profiling of potential gun buyers, claims firearms expert and former editor of Shotgun News, John Snyder.

On Thursday, politicians in Connecticut watched their governor sign a measure that lists more over 100 firearms as being banned and illegal for anyone to own. That state's assault weapons ban, creates a dangerous weapon offender registry and institutes eligibility rules for ammunition purchases.

Some observers believe the shortage of ammo is a result of federal government agencies purchasing millions and millions of rounds of ammunition bullets with the goal of eventually hoarding billions of rounds and thereby disarming the populace who must then scramble to find ammunition suppliers.

"Department of Homeland Security and the federal government itself is buying up ammunition and components at such a rate, it's causing artificial shortage of supplies for the regular consumer," Jesse Alday, a state corrections officer who was buying a couple of boxes of ammo, told AP on Thursday.

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"They're buying it up as fast as they can, for reasons they're not officially willing to admit or go into. ... They're not willing to come up with any answers as to the reasons behind why they have enough ammunition on the U.S., on our own home soil, to wage a 25-year war," Alday said. "That's kind of strange."

And then there's fear of the gun enforcers -- the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives -- who have a reputation for treating law-abiding citizens like criminals even when they're in full compliance with gun regulations and laws.

"Of all the law enforcement agencies in the United States none are as distrusted and disliked by citizens as the ATF. What originally was a regulatory agency has become a paramilitary operation complete with armored vehicles, SWAT teams, and a high-powered arsenal," said Joseph Lawrence Casterio, a state prison corrections officer.

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"From what I'm hearing from gun dealers across the nation, it's becoming harder and harder for (gun) retailers to keep their stores well-stocked," said Saul Goshen, a New Jersey retailer. Goshen claims that some stores don't even have enough stock to service police officers and firing ranges.