The Age Of Panic

The Age Of Panic

As secular humanists try to erase Christianity, set themselves up as gods, and establish paradise upon the earth, they seem to foster an increasing aptitude to panic when anything goes wrong. In fact, it doesn’t have to be wrong, to touch off a panic. It only has to look wrong.

People get rather easily scared, these days: because the Smartest People in the World are in charge and nothing’s supposed to go wrong—and yet it does. They aren’t able to protect us, after all.

Last week in Baltimore, a high school had to be evacuated. They called the fire department, and then a hazmat team in hazmat suits. And in the brouhaha, five people—two students, three adults—somehow (we are not told how) managed to get themselves injured badly enough to be taken to the hospital. Did they fall down the stairs as they fled the building?

What was this menace that almost turned into a disaster movie?

Somebody plugged in a pumpkin spice air freshener, and I guess it smelled kind of funny.

Better safe than sorry, said the authorities. But I’ll bet the five people who wound up in the hospital, because of pumpkin spice, were sorry.

It’s not just Americans who are so easily spooked anymore.

Last week in England, during the morning rush hour in one of the commuter trains, a man stood up and read some verses of the Bible. We aren’t told what verses, but there’s nothing in the Bible tantamount to “Everybody run! Godzilla’s coming!”

One of his fellow commuters told the man he was making people uneasy and asked him to stop: which he did, but it was already too late to avert the stampede. Quite a few riders panicked, forced open the windows, and dove out onto the tracks. Not wanting anyone to get fried, railroad authorities had to turn off the power. Meanwhile, the scared-out-of-their-wits commuters told a security guard that the man with the Bible said he had a bomb and was going to blow everybody up. In fact, he’d said no such thing, and the riders who hadn’t panicked vigorously refuted that claim.

What made those other commuters say something so blatantly untrue? Probably their sheer panic, nothing more. You know how it is: one person says something crazy, off the top of his head, and in the blink of an eye, everybody’s saying it. Although the man with the Bible hadn’t broken any laws, written security procedures obliged police to remove him from the train, which they did as gently and politely as they could. But because so many people lost their heads, the daily commute was all gummed up for hours.

Why these panics? In Western cities on both sides of the Atlantic, terror attacks and mass shootings have become a regular feature of the news, and people now know their governments can’t—or won’t—protect them. The ruling class’s attitude seems to be, “We’re gonna have a multicultural society if it kills you!” And they really don’t seem to care if it does.

A government that will not protect its people has no reason for existing, and people have learned that they simply aren’t safe. Their rulers fritter away their time protecting them from imaginary threats—Man-Made Climate Change, white privilege, toxic masculinity, whatever—but when it comes to protecting them from jihad johnnies, they’re asleep at the switch. Go figure.

This is what happens when Real Smart People try to play God, promising all kinds of goodies that they’ll never be able to deliver.

We have turned away from God, and our idols and false messiahs can’t protect us.

I have discussed these and other topics throughout the week in my blog, http://leeduigon.com/ . Stop in and visit today. A single click will get you there.

© 2017 Lee Dyugon – All Rights Reserved

E-Mail Lee Duigon: [email protected]

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Lee Duigon

Author Email: [email protected]

Lee Duigon, a contributing editor with the Chalcedon Foundation, is a former newspaper reporter and editor, small businessman, teacher, and horror novelist. He has been married to his wife, Patricia, for 34 years. See his new fantasy/adventure novels, Bell Mountain and The Cellar Beneath the Cellar, available on www.amazon.com Website: LeeDuigon.com E-Mail: [email protected]


Author Email: [email protected]